Bullish

(redirected from bullishness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to bullishness: Bullish Indicators

Bullish

Word used to describe an investor's attitude. Bullish refers to an optimistic outlook, while bearish means a pessimistic outlook.

Bullish

Describing an indicator that prices are likely to rise. A simple example of a bullish indicator is a large number of margin transactions, which means investors are buying and generally leads to higher prices. See also: Bearish.

bullish

Of or relating to the belief that a particular stock or the market as a whole is headed for a period of generally rising prices. Compare bearish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Manager bullishness for this asset class increased to 50 percent in the most recent survey.
We believe the surge in manager bullishness for fixed income represents a flight to safety and that managers fundamentally believe that the bigger opportunity still lies in the equity markets," said Lert.
At 57 percent, bullishness declined seven percentage points from 64 percent last quarter, and is off 18 percentage points from a year ago.
Manager bullishness on financial services rose slightly from 30 percent to 32 percent but still represents a dramatic fall from 46 percent bullishness one year ago.
large cap growth remains the managers' favorite asset class at 67 percent, manager bullishness for U.
It ended lower in the morning but later picked up, benefiting from the bullishness, brokers said.
Autos and transportation (26 percent bullishness, up 12 percentage points from March 2009).
Technology ranked as the sector garnering the most manager bullishness for the fourth consecutive quarter, rising four percentage points from its previous all-time high last quarter to 82 percent.
Manager bullishness for cash fell from 9 percent to 6 percent from the last Investment Manager Outlook and reached a new all-time survey low.
investment managers conducted by Russell Investments, reveal that professional investment managers have dialed down their bullishness from last quarter, particularly in the areas of emerging markets and corporate bonds.
In the latest survey, managers' asset class preferences echo this fear in the increased bullishness for more defensive, risk-minded areas.
The main drivers for the long term bullishness for the regional markets is the young and growing population, and the demand that arises from the population growth, said Gadir Abu Leil-Cooper, head of EMEA equities, Baring Asset Management.