break

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Break

A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: Crash.

Break

1. A sudden, unexpected change in a security's price or in a market's value. While a break could indicate either upward or downward change, the connotation is negative. Especially on the futures market, a break means a steep decline in price, usually the result of a natural disaster affecting the underlying.

2. Less frequently, break refers to a discrepancy in a brokerage's accounting books.

break

1. A sharp price decline in a particular security or in the market as a whole. A break usually occurs when unexpected negative information is made public and investors rush to sell. Also called market break.
2. A discrepancy on the books of a brokerage firm.

break

1. To dissolve an underwriting syndicate.
2. See bust.
References in periodicals archive ?
76% of cancer patients said breakthrough pain affects their ability to perform household chores.
When presenting the survey results, Tone Rustoen noted that the management of breakthrough cancer pain should be implemented as an integral part of nurse's cancer pain treatment training in order to improve patient pain outcomes and well-being.
The most dramatic environmental performance breakthroughs will be driven by fundamental process technology changes.
Established in 2007, Breakthrough Advisory Group, LLC, provides clients nationwide with a variety of IT and communications solutions, spanning the entire IT landscape.
Breakthrough Junior Challenge is funded by Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan, and Yuri and Julia Milner, through the Breakthrough Prize Foundation, based on a grant from Mark Zuckerberg's fund at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation and a grant from Milner Global Foundation.
There is no widely accepted definition, classification system or well-validated assessment tool for cancer-related breakthrough pain, but there is strong concurrence on most of its key attributes.
Science said that 1996 brought ``a series of stunning breakthroughs both in AIDS treatment and in basic research on HIV, the virus that causes the disease.
Over decades of partnering with these clients - usually following a program that has failed to achieve expected value - we have identified a broad range of actions and competencies that can improve the chances for breakthrough success.