break

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Related to breaks: Breakbeat

Break

A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: Crash.

Break

1. A sudden, unexpected change in a security's price or in a market's value. While a break could indicate either upward or downward change, the connotation is negative. Especially on the futures market, a break means a steep decline in price, usually the result of a natural disaster affecting the underlying.

2. Less frequently, break refers to a discrepancy in a brokerage's accounting books.

break

1. A sharp price decline in a particular security or in the market as a whole. A break usually occurs when unexpected negative information is made public and investors rush to sell. Also called market break.
2. A discrepancy on the books of a brokerage firm.

break

1. To dissolve an underwriting syndicate.
2. See bust.
References in classic literature ?
I hope,'' said Athelstane, somewhat moved by this part of his friend's discourse, ``they will not forget to send us some wine and refactions at noon we had scarce a breathing-space allowed to break our fast, and I never have the benefit of my food when I eat immediately after dismounting from horseback, though the leeches recommend that practice.
You carried news heavy enough to break the thickest ice ever frozen.
Spending breaks this way delivers more rest so you return to your work more recovered.
The Billiards League matches produced half a dozen players who made breaks of 25 or over.
para]]National survey finds that many Americans want, but don't take, breaks every day[[/para]]
The power breaking divisions include knife hand breaks and palm strike breaks with either boards or bricks.
Breaks in the air, breaks in the skin, breaks in the now, breaks in the
THE number of Britons taking gap year trips and other long breaks has increased 14-fold since the 1970s.
Many landlords have successfully resisted lease breaks by citing errors in a tenant's notice.
A Regulation of lunch breaks revolves around state laws, which may mandate that lunch breaks are (or are not) paid.
While traditional workplaces such as factories favoured more regimented breaks organised around shift patterns, today's offices enjoy much more flexible working arrangements.
In addition, they receive generous tax breaks for clergy housing and church-run projects that may only be tangentially related to religion.