break

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Break

A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: Crash.

Break

1. A sudden, unexpected change in a security's price or in a market's value. While a break could indicate either upward or downward change, the connotation is negative. Especially on the futures market, a break means a steep decline in price, usually the result of a natural disaster affecting the underlying.

2. Less frequently, break refers to a discrepancy in a brokerage's accounting books.

break

1. A sharp price decline in a particular security or in the market as a whole. A break usually occurs when unexpected negative information is made public and investors rush to sell. Also called market break.
2. A discrepancy on the books of a brokerage firm.

break

1. To dissolve an underwriting syndicate.
2. See bust.
References in periodicals archive ?
Breaking wind is not a reportable matter - though it may be a bit offensive.
What we could do then is appoint a director of the prevention of breaking wind in public.
It was not the first time Janet had clashed with Brian over breaking wind.
A PENSIONER involved in a row with her neighbour claims she was reported to police for BREAKING WIND.
Could it be that earlier, when he wished to impress her by not breaking wind in front of her, he was being polite in letting her break wind first?
A love of drink, drugs, self-destruction, breaking wind into microphones, and being former stars of a hit comedy called Two And Half Men (Gazza starred with Jimmy Five Bellies).
But whether it will prevent you breaking wind during intercourse is, I'm afraid, debatable.
Breaking wind isn't a serious health issue unless there are other gut symptoms.
A WACKY science exhibition which teaches children about burping and breaking wind opened to the public yesterday.
Flounder, named after the character in the classic American comedy Animal House, can also make a noise that sounds exactly like someone breaking wind and then says "excuse me".
She said his behaviour was so offensive that staff dreaded coming to work Walton admitted belching, breaking wind and swearing at the practice in Whitchurch, Shrops, but only in front of staff, not patients, and that it did not happen regularly.