Branch

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Branch

An operation in a foreign country incorporated in the home country.

Branch

1. An office or subsidiary of a company that exists and conducts operations in a country other than the one in which the company is headquartered. See also: MNC.

2. A semi-independent office of a bank. For example, a bank may have five branches in a city where account holders can make deposits and withdrawals and conduct other business at the place most convenient for them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tree to 8 m tall or shrub, with crowded, short, spreading branches; bark scaly, purplebrown; branchlets red-brown, first-year and sometimes second-year shoots green; buds ovoid, the scales persistent, rounded or only slightly keeled, obtuse.
Shrubs with dense ascending branches or with vigorous growth and spreading branches; bark red-brown; branchlets brown, first-year shoots green', buds ovoid, the scales persistent, and less keeled than T.
Tree or shrub, often densely branched; bark red-brown to red-orange; branchlets olive-green, often red-brown above, not changing to brown (at least on the more vigorous growth); buds ovoid, the scales persistent, not as strongly keeled as T.
Dioecious, occasionally monoecious, small or large trees 5-30 m tall; bark gray-brown to light brown or orange-brown, smooth when young, narrowly fissured with age; branches opposite or whorled; branchlets opposite or subopposite, green the first year, changing to dark red-brown, brown or gray by the third year; buds ovoid, acute, prismatic, 3-12 mm long, the scales persistent or deciduous, few, imbricate, lustrous, ovate, keeled.
Pollen strobili simple, axillary, on the most recent year's branchlets, borne on minute recurved peduncles so that the strobili are most easily visible from the lower surface of the branchlet, 4-10 mm long, subtended by 12 or 16 keeled sterile scales arranged in 4 vertical rows; microsporophylls numerous (20-36), arranged in alternating whorls of 4, hyposporangiate (occasionally perisporangiate), dorsiventral, each with (3-)4(-6-7) microsporangia.
Without this information identification is difficult, the only reasonably reliable feature being the color change of the branchlets in the third year of growth.
The genus is distinguished from Taxus by its opposite or subopposite branchlets and lack of a prominent midrib on the upper surface of the leaf.
Branchlets dark red-brown or brown by the third year; spines at leaf tips usually 2 mm long T.
Tree, 5-30 m, conical or round-topped with slender, spreading, slightly pendulous branches; bark gray-brown to orange-brown, smooth, developing narrow furrows; branchlets green in the first year, turning brown by the third year; buds 8-10 mm long.
Tree to 25 m tall or shrub; bark gray-brown; branchlets green the first year, becoming yellow-green the second year and finally gray.
Shrub or occasionally tree to 25 m tall; bark gray-brown; branchlets green the first year, yellow-green the second year and gray by the third year.
or shrub with numerous ascending branches; branchlets spreading, somewhat pendulous, green-brown the first year, red-brown the second year, gray thereafter.