block

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Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Regional anesthesia for shoulder surgery involves a brachial plexus block usually performed in the interscalene area.
Fatal streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of axillary brachial plexus block.
Doppler ultrasound blood flow detector in supraclavicular brachial plexus block.
Continuous interscalene brachial plexus block via an ultrasound-guided posterior approach: a randomized, triple-masked, placebo-controlled study.
We often perform individual peripheral nerve blocks in the proximal forearm bilaterally or in conjunction with a contralateral brachial plexus block to reduce or eliminate the concerns associated with bilateral brachial plexus block.
The first brachial plexus block was performed under direct vision after surgical exposure: this approach was rapidly set aside in favour of percutaneous injection of anaesthetic through a needle in a precise and landmarked point.
It is known that the axillary approach of the brachial plexus block should be performed as proximal as possible in the axilla, since at this anatomic point the terminal branches of the brachial plexus are in very close relationship1.
However, an anaesthesiologist who was not involved in the performance of brachial plexus block, patient care or data collection prepared all local anaesthetic solutions.
I note a two (or more) needle technique is preferred for axillary and infraclavicular single-shot brachial plexus block, without any associated increase in neurological complications (4,5).