Bracero

(redirected from braceros)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Bracero

An agreement between the United States and Mexico whereby agricultural, industrial and other laborers from Mexico were permitted to enter the United States in order to work. The program came from an agreement between U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and Mexican President Manuel Avila Camacho to help with the American labor shortage resulting from the war effort. It began in 1942 and ended in 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contradiction to class alignments, some employers of the braceros raised opposition to the deportation efforts, while most Cuban workers displayed little concern with the plight of their Afro-Antillean counterparts.
It is widely accepted that Chavez had little choice but to campaign for the exclusion of braceros in the early 1960s as part of his organizing drive.
Garcia y Griego (1996) notes that Mexican figures for the numbers of braceros differ from the U.
While hidden from history for more than one half-century, the plight of the braceros has gained public exposure in the past year with a lawsuit charging malfeasance and negligence filed in federal court against the governments of Mexico and the U.
Congress, soon after Proposition 187 was passed, to recommend the reintroduction of a bracero migrant program.
I want the kids to go out and play and have fun,'' Braceros said.
This team's got a lot of speed and can score," Braceros said.
What made things more difficult for Hammonds, Braceros said, was that the seniors and juniors on the team, people like Heather Good, Emily Rice, Kristi Giordano and Cristie Burnett, were a group that had high expectations for everyone, including freshmen.
Today, those braceros are waging a war of their own -- a legal battle to collect possibly as much as $1 billion that was withheld from an estimated 5 million Mexicans who worked in the bracero program from 1942 until it was disbanded in 1964.
Residents in this community--originally created in 1957 as a work camp to quarantine Haitian braceros (sugar cane workers)--have never been free from poverty or systemic negligence.
Like many other braceros, Jesus "Jesse" Morfin periodically returned to Mexico, but ultimately settled in the United States.
Ngai looks with respect on the program's effort to set standards for wages, housing, and guarantees of employment for the braceros.