Water

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Water

In auto sales, a slang term for false equity. For example, water occurs when a car owner claims $3,000 in equity on a vehicle when she only has $1,500 in equity.
References in periodicals archive ?
This behaviour could be explained by bound water dominating the [[epsilon].
Two types of bound water were postulated by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique and desorption experiments (20).
These results illustrate the reduction of bound water in the cell walls caused by the cold temperatures (Table 6).
Therefore, a considerably better cell structure can be obtained by using the bound water and/or the water of constitution released from the wood fiber, rather than injecting the water directly in the extrusion barrel into the plastic melt.
The amount of free water in wood at 40 percent MC was not enough to rapidly move boron from cell to cell, so that boron should diffuse through bound water in cell walls regardless of the diffusion direction.
Therefore, the bound water was assumed to be the same for all specimens irrespective of the rubber concentration, and as a result, responsible for the same changes in [T.
Bound water dusters, together with the macromolecules of a gel matrix, make slow collective diffuse motions about the equilibrium centers, remaining stationary on average.
Blazeguard's unique patented ceramic like coatings contain chemically bound water molecules which act as a barrier between fire and wood.
Blazeguard's unique patented ceramic like coatings contains chemically bound water molecules which act as a barrier between fire and wood.
NUMAR's patented Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging ("MRIL(R)") tool makes previously unobtainable, real-time measurements of free and bound water, permeability and fluid viscosity by applying the concepts of MRI used commonly in the medical field.
Bound water in this sodium silicate product causes the particles to expand into closed-cell spheres at temperatures above 300 F.