buy

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Related to bought the farm: kick the bucket, knows the ropes

Buy

To purchase an asset; taking a long position.

Buy

To take ownership of some asset in exchange for some monetary remuneration. Buying may take any of several forms. In a cash purchase, the buyer gives cash or a cash equivalent immediately in exchange for the asset. In a credit sale, the buyer takes ownership immediately in exchange for future payment, often with interest. An example of buying is a simple transaction involving widgets. If the buyer is willing to pay $2 per widget and the seller wishes to sell 100 widgets, then the seller gives to the buyer 100 widgets and, in their place, receives $200. See also: Sale.

buy

A bargain-priced asset. For example, an analyst may feel that a particular firm owns valuable assets overlooked or undervalued by the financial community. In such an instance, the firm's stock is considered a buy.

buy

To purchase a security or other asset. Compare sell.

make

or

buy

the decision by a firm on whether to make a component or product itself or to buy it from an external supplier (see OUTSOURCING). The decision will depend upon the combined production costs and TRANSACTION COSTS of the alternatives. Sometimes a firm may adopt mixes of the two policies, producing some quantity of the product itself and buying the remainder, depending upon the relative costs of the sources and security of supply considerations. See TRANSACTION for a more detailed discussion. See INTERNALIZATION, VERTICAL INTEGRATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
We bought the farm so they could run free without having to worry about cars but now they're stuck indoors most of the time.
According to Judith: "When we bought the farm and had originally thought of pulling up the vines, which were all overgrown, but decided to give the vineyard a second chance.
The couple, who were aware that the area had been identified as one that was suitable to erect wind turbines when they bought the farm in 2004, estimate that saying yes to the developers would earn them more than pounds 200,000 a year for the next 20 to 25 years ( as much as pounds 6m.
The Doyles, who bought the farm in Great Barrow to stable their six horses, now face losing pounds 120,000 of their investment because as a farm building the property will be worth just pounds 40,000.
When the present family of owners bought the farm in 1949, Mr Lewis continued working.
Griff Rhys Jones told the Western Mail recently he bought the farm on a whim after seeing it in the window of a Fishguard estate agent.