Toxin

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Related to botulinum toxin: botulism, Clostridium botulinum, Botulinum toxin type a, tetanus toxin

Toxin

Any poisonous substance a living thing produces as part of its metabolic or other natural process. That is, toxins themselves are not living things, but are produced by living things. Toxins are defined by the Biological Weapons Convention.
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Botulinum toxin type A as a migraine preventive treatment.
No evidence has linked the use of botulinum toxin to permanent degeneration or atrophy of muscles, even in patients injected with high levels of botulinum repeatedly over an extended period of time.
A multicentre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of glabellar lines.
All of the 44 studies reviewed here that examined the effects of repeated botulinum toxin type A treatments found sustained or enhanced improvement over the follow-up period, which ranged from a few treatments to more than 10 years of treatment.
Pooled analyses of the data suggested that botulinum toxin A was associated with fewer headaches per month among patients with chronic daily headaches and among patients with chronic migraine headaches.
Warning: Distant Spread of Toxin Effect Postmarketing reports indicate that the effects of Dysport and all botulinum toxin products may spread from the area of injection to produce symptoms consistent with botulinum toxin effects.
Early research suggests that there could be a role for botulinum toxin in combating itch by better understanding the interaction of the vascular system in inflammatory skin conditions.
There are other Botulinum Toxin Type A products available, including; Azzalure and Dysport, made by Galderma, and Bocouture and Xeomin from Merz.
Thirteen years later, they received the FDA's approval to market the use of botulinum toxin (type A) as a treatment which--in people aged 18 to 65 years--would temporarily improve the appearance of moderate to severe frown lines between the eyebrows (glabellar lines).
Botulinum toxin acts presynaptically at cholinergic nerve terminals by preventing acetylcholine exocytosis and release and causes muscle paresis which can last for two to three months (1,2).
WAIKOLOA, HAWAII - Microwave technology is a new hyperhidrosis treatment that may offer longer-term efficacy than botulinum toxin, Dr.
Botulinum toxin A treatment is considered to be effective and safe for frontal hyperhidrosis.