bottomland

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bottomland

Lowlands located in a valley or other low area near rivers,streams,or bodies of water prone to flooding.Bottomland was especially prized by farmers at one time because of the constant deposit of nutrient-rich soils.

References in periodicals archive ?
By all rights, the bottomlands should be included in The Nature Conservancy's Willamette Confluence Project.
Breeding habitat in bottomland hardwood forests of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains and in high mountain riverine areas of the Appalachian Mountains is disjunct.
The river and its surrounding bottomland forests have harbored diverse species of plants and wildlife, including inestimable flights of ducks that swarmed the area when cold winter rains pushed the Cache out of its banks and into the vast acreage of hardwood trees.
Patterson and Clark 1988); yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera; Patterson and Clark 1992); red pine (Pinus resinosa), northern red oak (Quercus rubra), and yellow poplar (Patterson and Wiant 1993); bottomland hardwoods (Leahart et al.
Our survival estimate was higher than the only other study found in the literature that examined survival of adult female raccoons in a bottomland hardwood forest environment (Chamberlain et al.
Floodplain bottomlands often have diverse topographies consisting of repeated ridges, swales and meandering scrolls (Leopold et al.
Stuart indicated collecting it from sandy bottomland (along Wea Creek), an unusual habitat for the species.
For generations the remaining bottomland forests of the Mississippi River and its tributaries have survived as places where trees grow large, shadows grow deep, and sinuous rivers and streams move at a snail's pace.
Dennis hazards a guess that perhaps as many as 20 pairs occupy the bottomland hardwoods from Cache River south to (and probably including) the White River National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses almost 90 miles (145 km) of the White River in Arkansas down to the Mississippi River.
The Columbia Bottomlands provides the only expanse of forest adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico in Texas.
In the late nineteenth century, the Tallahatchie bottomlands formed an "eastern gateway to the still almost virgin wilderness of swamp and jungle which stretched westward from the hills to the towns and plantations along the Mississippi" (Reivers 738) and created the physical setting for "The Bear" and many other wilderness stories by Faulkner.
the Columbia Bottomlands project represents the first that will primarily incorporate natural forest re-growth as opposed to mass planting of native bottomland hardwoods.