Borrowing Costs

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Borrowing Costs

The amount of money paid in interest on a loan or other debt. In other words, it is what one must spend in order to receive money. Borrowing costs are expenses for both personal and business loans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unless the adjustment programme is completed as agreed and we also do what it takes to strengthen our economy, our borrowing cost will keep rising.
Borrowing cost capitalization does not take place, however, during periods when activities have ceased or have yet to begin, such as when land is held for future development.
The British bank said that if money market mutual funds were to put more cash into Treasury bills and repurchase agreements rather than bank commercial paper, US borrowing costs could increase.
The Turkish economy minister has called on the central bank to drastically control its borrowing costs.
Falling borrowing costs are expected to reduce the UK debt interest bill by over GBO30bn by 2019, giving Chancellor George Osborne more range to fund pre-election give-aways or to relax the squeeze on the state, the Telegraph revealed on Sunday.
Dubai: Bank of Sharjah, or BoS, plans to refinance a $200 million two-year loan maturing next year, said the lender's executive director, as the bank hopes to benefit from lower borrowing costs.
4% in the ten years from independence to achieve the Maastricht Treaty agreed debt-to-GDP ratio of 60% under borrowing costs likely to be as much as 1.
As in 1994, the Fed's more hawkish posture has resulted in rising borrowing costs outside of the US.
Issuers from the UAE are tapping the market this year to benefit from a drop in borrowing costs.
MADRID -- Spain's borrowing costs tumbled in a major bond auction Thursday as Madrid scrambled to decide "within weeks" whether to snatch a euro zone financial lifeline.
However, traders took some heart from his vow to devise a plan to help ease the borrowing costs of beleaguered peripheral countries, as Spain's borrowing costs fell back below the 7% danger mark.
The downgrade of Italy to just two notches above junk status could raise already-painful borrowing costs for the country and risks undermining Prime Minister Mario Monti's efforts to turn market sentiment through tough fiscal and structural reforms.