Borrow

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Borrow

To obtain or receive money on loan with the promise or understanding that it will be repaid.

Borrow

To receive money from another party with the agreement that the money will be repaid. Most borrowers borrow at interest, meaning they pay a certain percentage of the principal amount to the lender as compensation for borrowing. Most loans also have a maturity date by which time the borrower must have repaid the loan. Borrowing occurs informally from family and friends, at the retail level through a bank, and also on a large scale involving governments and institutional investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
If, as a result, bank borrowing at the discount window becomes more difficult to predict, operating procedures that rely on accurate predictions of borrowing, such as nonborrowed reserves or borrowed reserves targeting, will be less successful in controlling monetary aggregates.
IRISH readers had legal matters on their minds last year with John Grisham's The Litigators the most borrowed book from public libraries.
Only about ten days ago, the Government borrowed 63 million euros.
On October 29, 2008, Societe Generale borrowed $5 billion (Source: Bloomberg)
He said: "While December borrowing was lower than the same month last year and below market expectations, the UK still borrowed nearly pounds 17bn in one month.
Borrowed car, borrowed girl, Jaguar, took her for a whirl.
Borrowing would be through the Public Works Loan Board (PWLB) to achieve the best rate of interest on the capital borrowed (currently 2.
It was passed by 20 council members and rejected by 14, but if 21 had voted against it then the government would have been ordered to return all the money it had borrowed so far.
The government borrowing from private banks rose to Rs 366 billion; which is less than Rs 863 billion borrowed during the same period last year.
India borrowed around 65 per cent of its full year needs during the first half of 2013/14.
Borrowed monies can usually be traced to an eligible use for deductibility of interest purposes under current administrative policies of Revenue Canada.
New York City learned that the hard way in the mid-seventies, when it went broke after shifting millions of dollars of police salaries and vocational education costs into its capital budget and then borrowed to fund them.