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Boom

A period of rapid, strong economic and/or stock growth. For example, some developing countries post GDP growth of 10-12% per year, especially after they have liberalized their economic policies. Likewise, some stocks may become suddenly very popular, resulting in a boom. The dot-com bubble is one of the most famous examples of a stock boom. The problem with booms is that the growth is rarely sustainable, as investors become more and more speculative and take needless risks. Thus, most booms ultimately result in busts. Many economists believe the boom-and-bust cycle is an inevitable part of doing business, while others believe that government regulation can limit both booms and busts.

boom

see BUSINESS CYCLE.

boom

a phase of the BUSINESS CYCLE characterized by FULL EMPLOYMENT levels of output (ACTUAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT) and some upward pressure on the general PRICE LEVEL (see INFLATIONARY GAP). Boom conditions are dependent on there being a high level of AGGREGATE DEMAND, which may come about autonomously or be induced by expansionary FISCAL POLICY and MONETARY POLICY. See DEMAND MANAGEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Split boom, an economic boom designed for operating in light to medium jobsite conditions.
As oil continues to spill onto the coast, absorbent booms will be even more effective in marshy areas or along coastlines than in the ocean where there is a lot of turbulence.
He said, The president of AME, Jeff Campbell, was impressed with the safety and efficiency of the Nelson Boom Launch Trailer.
We are honoured to support the creation of pilots for TV, Film or the Web that will become excellent programming for the small and big screens" shared Joan Vogelesang, President and Chief Executive Officer at Toon Boom.
Four low-boom and two normal-intensity-boom missions are scheduled, with up to six sonic booms on each mission.
There is no way of knowing yet when the Fed will achieve a level of interest rates adequate to cool the housing boom and encourage a recovery of household savings.
Global said that the company has commenced litigation against the subcontractor that designed, fabricated and warranted the booms to recover these repair expenses and other damages.
Bank credit expansion, wrote Rothbard, "sets into motion the business cycle in all its phases -- the inflationary boom, marked by the expansion of the money supply and malinvestment; the crisis, which arrives when credit expansion ceases and malinvestments become evident; and the depression recovery, the necessary adjustment process by which the economy returns to the most efficient ways of satisfying consumer desires.
In April 1994, researchers from the Armstrong Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio conducted a series of flight tests at Edwards Air Force Base in California to collect data on the ability of air crews to focus sonic booms and control the placement of them.
A similar fabric boom was used in the summer of 1990 at Sea Cliff Village Beach in Nassau County, New York, in an effort to reduce coliform bacteria.
The boom came to an end as housing prices became less and less affordable and as more and more homeowners and investors began to think that values were approaching their peak.
Annualized market revenue data for surgical booms from 2003 to 2010, forecast forward for 7 years to 2017.