accounts receivable

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Accounts receivable

Money owed by customers.

Accounts Receivable

1. Money that a customer owes a company for a good or service purchased on credit. Accounts receivable are current assets for a company and are expected to be paid within a short amount of time, often 10, 30, or 90 days. See also: Collection period.

2. A unit within a company's accounting department that deals with accounts receivable.

accounts receivable

Money owed to a business by customers who have bought goods or services on credit. Accounts receivables are current assets that continually turn into cash as customers pay their bills. Also called receivables.

accounts receivable

see DEBTORS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Judges did not determine whether debtors and creditors used book accounts or formal written credit instruments to memorialize their legal obligations.
Retail loans remain a key area for Emirates NBD as we continue to focus on meeting the evolving needs of our customers," said Shekhar Krishnamurthy, Head -- Retail Assets and Liabilities, Emirates NBD "Our personal loan book accounts for almost 50 per cent of Emirates NBD's total retail asset book.
Retail loans remain a key area for Emirates NBD as we continue to focus on meeting the evolving needs of our customers," said Shekhar Krishnamurthy, Head - Retail Assets and Liabilities, Emirates NBD "Our personal loan book accounts for almost 50 per cent of Emirates NBD's total retail asset book.
This book accounts for one of the intractable features of Dante's style, his seemingly gratuitous astronomical imagery -- a mannerism parodied by Chaucer: "th'orisonte hath reft the sonne his lyght, -- This is as muche to seye, as it was nyght" (Franklin's Tale, 1017-18).
Now fans can bank with Bowie as he has launched his on-line service Bowiebanc, offering mortgages, free online bill paying services, a five per cent annual interest rate on cheque book accounts and a 24-hour service.
Traders received a higher percentage of profits generated in back book accounts than for profits in their market making accounts, giving them greater incentive to generate profits in the back book accounts.