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Related to body louse: head louse, Bed bugs

Body

The main part of a document or advertisement. The body provides the most detailed information compared to other parts of a document. Especially in marketing, it is intended to elicit the desired response from the reader.
References in periodicals archive ?
An experimental model of human body louse infection with Rickettsia typhi.
But the body louse lives in clothing and, unlike the head louse, can spread bacterial diseases.
The body louse has figured in a number of history's main events.
quintana is the body louse, although recent studies suggest head lice may also vector disease agents (10-12).
Before genetic tools that differentiate the head and body louse lineages were available (5), it was speculated that body lice may have originated from head lice (9).
quintana has been detected in head louse specimens collected in Ethiopia and Senegal (5-7) and in body louse specimens collected in Burundi, Rwanda, Zimbabwe (8), and Ethiopia (3); we add Democratic Republic of the Congo to the list.
These authors demonstrated that the body louse could be infected when living on a septicemic patient, could stay alive for 7 days with infectious feces, and could transmit plague (9).
The human body louse and human head louse are generally recognized as 2 subspecies of Pediculus humanus (P.
Depending on the populations targeted, these interventions may include education, free condom distribution, syringe and needle prescription programs, chest radiography screening for tuberculosis, directly observed therapy for tuberculosis treatment, improvement of personal clothing and bedding hygiene, and widespread use of ivermectin for scabies and body louse infestation.
Although the body louse is the traditional vector of B.
The role of the human body louse in the transmission of relapsing fever was reported by MacKie in 1907 (1).
Rickettsia prowazekii is the causative agent of epidemic for louseborne typhus, which is transmitted by the human body louse.