Board Foot

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Board Foot

A unit of volume used to measure quantities of wood in Canada and the United States. One board foot is equivalent to 2.360 cubic meters.
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While federal court injunctions were in place during 1991 and 1992, a total of 1 billion board feet of timber was sold.
A single giant tulip poplar could yield 20,000 board feet of timber.
Last year, the facility purchased about 60,000 board feet of wood for its value-added creations.
The finished lumber average sales price decreased $73, or 22 percent, from $328 per thousand board feet in 2010 to $255 per thousand board feet in 2011.
Forest Service data show 1,100 million board feet of logs shipped out of the Northwest in 2010, compared to 700 million feet in 2009.
The Daveluyville remanufacturing facility produced 4 million board feet of edge-glued panels per year using 70 people.
1 billion board feet (mmmbf) of timber, most of it live green trees.
Creating jobs, Congress in 1951 gave the Ketchikan Pulp Company (KPC) a 50-year contract, which compelled the USFS to sell KPC (a Louisiana-Pacific subsidiary) 200 million board feet of timber - about 10,000 acres of high-volume old growth - per year at a guaranteed price.
25 /PRNewswire/ -- Lumber prices continued to climb today, reaching $486 per 1,000 board feet in the wake of the Clinton administration's release of its final Northwest Forest Plan which opted to protect spotted owls and other species at the expense of jobs and future lumber supplies for home building, according to the National Association of Home Builders.
In Southwestern Ohio, the price for standing, mixed hardwood timber has fluctuated around $100 per thousand board feet for some time.
The improvement is due to an eight percent decrease in the cost per thousand board feet of lumber produced due to reduced stumpage prices in the Company's operating region and continued improvements in hourly production rates and other operating efficiencies.
7 billion board feet in 2009 - the lowest amount since the middle of the Great Depression, when loggers harvested 2.

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