Barrier

(redirected from blood-brain barrier)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Barrier

1. See: Trade barrier.

2. See: Barrier Option.
References in periodicals archive ?
Focusing on the damage of the blood-brain barrier shows that it is an important factor possibly initiating changes in the brain that lead to dementia," Zlokovic says.
The tests showed that -- unlike currently available un-modified enzyme treatments -- the modified enzyme penetrated the blood-brain barrier and entered brain neurons and astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner.
Now Whitehead Institute scientists report that as the developing larval fruit fly brain grows by cell division, it instructs subperineurial glia (SPG) cells that form the blood-brain barrier to enlarge by creating multiple copies of their genomes in a process known as polyploidization.
But the patients on an ACE inhibitor that crossed the blood-brain barrier accounted for almost all of that difference in decline.
In its neuroprotective role, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) functions to hinder the delivery of many potentially important diagnostic and therapeutic agents to the brain.
They can block activated T cells from breaching the blood-brain barrier.
We used fluorescent proteins to look at the brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time," Peters said.
Once we understand how West Nile virus affects the pathways that control the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier, it may be possible to design drugs that prevent infection of the brain.
On the other hand, aerosolized particles that circumvent the blood-brain barrier might someday serve as delivery vehicles for drugs.
One limitation of any proposed cell culture system or invertebrate model for developmental neurotoxicity is that the fetal mammalian brain is typically protected by diffusion barriers: the placenta (Sastry 1991) and, depending on the stage of development, the blood-brain barrier (Saunders and Mollgard 1984).
MS involves an inappropriate activation of immune-system cells, which enables them to leave the blood stream, breach a protective layer called the blood-brain barrier, enter the central nervous system, and initiate attacks on myelin, the fatty protein layer that normally protects and insulates nerve fibers, or axons.
SEATTLE -- Impel NeuroPharma today announced a set of important milestones that accelerate its progress in enabling small molecules and biologics to bypass the blood-brain barrier.