Count

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Count

On a point & figure chart, an estimation of future price movements. Point & figure charts seek to identify support and resistance levels. Counts are estimates on the likelihood that a security will break through one or the other and result in a large profit or loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
The accuracy of the full blood count and CD4 values was subject to strict internal and external quality assurance procedures.
Results of blood count comparison obtained by simultaneous analysis of 156 patient samples on CD 17000S and MEK-8118K (Nihon Kohden, Tokyo, Japan) hematologic analyzers showed a satisfactory correlation for all the parameters tested, ranging from 0.
Trainer John Gosden said: "Her routine blood count wasn't where I wanted to see it.
The CPT coding manual defines CBC: complete blood count includes Hgb, Hct, RBC, WBC, and platelet count.
He had no respiratory complaints, and results of his chest radiographs were normal, but the complete blood count showed hemoconcentration and mild thrombocytopenia (130,000 platelets/[micro]L).
As time went on, he became stronger, his blood count was good, and he returned to school.
Luca Cumani's five-year-old entire will play no part in the 12-furlong contest after he was discovered to have a bad blood count.
Luca Cumani's five-year-old will play no part in the 12-furlong contest after he was discovered to have a bad blood count.
ORLANDO -- The various measures of a complete blood count together helped in the development of a risk score that was very effective for predicting a patient's subsequent risk of death or myocardial infarction.
The nurse may note leukopenia and thrombocytopenia on a complete blood count report.
A worldwide testing programme involving 7,500 patients at centres including Glasgow Royal Infirmary and Hammersmith Hospital in London, found that Glivec normalised the patient's blood count in nine out of 10 patients in the chronic, or early, phase of the disease.
It is now better understood that if a person's blood count demonstrates a low white count and a low platelet count without a rash, the offending organism is the Ehrlichia canis rather than the organisms causing the other two tick-borne diseases.