black

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Black

Informal; describing a financial statement that ends with a positive assessment. For example, if a company produces a profit for a given period of time, it is said to be "in the black." The term comes from the color of ink used for such statements. See also: Red.

black

Of or relating to the profitability of a firm or the operations of a firm. The term derives from the color of ink used to enter a profit figure on a financial statement. Compare red.
References in classic literature ?
In that moment on the hilltop, they saw behind them a whirling black group on the snow.
Mary thought his black dewdrop eyes gazed at her with great curiosity.
This guileless confectioner was not by any means sober, and had a black eye in the green stage of recovery, which was painted over.
Elizabeth gave a piercing shriek, and the black of Agamemnon’s face changed to a muddy white.
They had reached that phase just after sunset when air and water both look bright, but earth and all its growing things look almost black by comparison.
At the same moment a girl's shriek rang out behind me and an instant later, as the blacks fell upon me.
The blacks are so unprincipled themselves that they can imagine no such thing as principle or honor in others, and especially do these blacks distrust an Englishman whom the Germans have taught them to believe are the most treacherous and degraded of people.
Then it was that the ape-man lifted his voice in a series of wild, weird screams that brought the blacks to a sudden, perplexed halt.
But he did know in large degree of certainty that, if he ever fainted there in the midst of the blacks, those who were able would be at his throat like ravening wolves.
Old scores could be settled, and it was the last chance, for the blacks who departed on the Arangi never came back.
So absorbed was the ape-man in speculation as to the purpose of the covered pit that he permitted the blacks to depart in the direction of their village without the usual baiting which had rendered him the terror of Mbonga's people and had afforded Tarzan both a vehicle of revenge and a source of inexhaustible delight.
The roof came down steep and black like a cowl, reaching out beyond the wide galleries that encircled the yellow stuccoed house.