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Black

Informal; describing a financial statement that ends with a positive assessment. For example, if a company produces a profit for a given period of time, it is said to be "in the black." The term comes from the color of ink used for such statements. See also: Red.

black

Of or relating to the profitability of a firm or the operations of a firm. The term derives from the color of ink used to enter a profit figure on a financial statement. Compare red.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fred Moten's path begins with resistance, but staying with the Object arrests the question of the Subject for Blackness.
This work's analysis of blackness is not centered on the United States but is more diasporic in scope, which greatly adds to its appeal.
The latest milestone in this development has been the emergence of the field of performance studies, which has enabled a new generation of scholars to ask questions and refine methodologies about theatricality--the forces and apparatuses that script production and reception--of blackness.
As the Dominican Republic is a country well-recognized for its polemic of racial identity, it is fitting for Boyd to dedicate an entire essay solely to the aesthetic of blackness through the experience of racial awareness in Dominican writing.
Episodes of Blackness takes place on Tuesday at 7:30pm.
1) While nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Anglo-American audiences laughed heartily at the antics of whites performing blackness, Germans are said to have completely missed the point.
The metaphors introduced by Walcott not only attempt to make the familiar concepts unfamiliar, but also attempt to realign traditional notions of whiteness and blackness.
Following Fryer and Levitt (2004), the blackness index is the probability of being black conditional on having the name in our sample.
Blackness and Modernity provides a neo-Hegelian exploration of Blackness, back to the Greeks and Romans, sideways to Africa, lingering on the Bible, Old and New Testaments, through the (false) promises of the Enlightenment and Modernity more generally, to tease out the intentions of multiculturalism in Canada and the consequences and despair produced by its limitations.
The white massas became the real butt of the joke and turned some of the attention away from the grotesquerie of blackness that was blackface.
among others, has observed that race is fundamentally a rhetorical trope, that is, blackness is a metaphor with fluctuating but powerful political implications, as we are well aware in the context of United States history.
It elevates a different kind of nuance in black portraiture, one that is even rarer: Sherald paints blackness that is quiet, ordinary and individual.