Analysis

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Related to bivariate analysis: multivariate analysis, univariate analysis

Analysis

The practice of examining information to determine what conclusions it indicates,. The information observed in analysis depends on the type of analysis being conducted. For example, technical analysis uses statistics to determine future price movements of securities, while fundamental analysis looks at indicators of a company's intrinsic value. Analysis may involve qualitative or quantitative information, or both. Most forms of analysis have both strengths and weaknesses.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 hours was significantly associated with AI on bivariate analysis and approached significance on multivariate analysis.
The presence dysmenorrhoea seemed to be an important factor in determining the different subcategories of the quality of life as well as the need to take any form of treatment, in the bivariate analysis.
Also in the present ultra-marathoners, percentage body fat and the sum of nine skinfolds was significantly and positively related to race performance in the bivariate analysis.
Estimation of (co)variance and correlation coefficients between body weight at hatch and at six weeks of age with bivariate analysis based on the most appropriate model (Model 8) Model [[sigma].
The statistical results also reveal that causality running from real GDP to HD does Granger cause only in bivariate analysis.
TABLE 2 Factors associated with a positive enterococcal isolate in bivariate analysis Enterococcus isolate Characteristic yes (n=67) Baseline characteristics Age (mean [+ or -] SD)* 60.
And, the correlation between IIH and HH size identified through bivariate analysis, remained negative and highly significant in the multivariate analysis.
Using bivariate analysis we show that it reduces to a non critical substitution of trees within trees and the distribution has a Catalan form that expresses as a power law with an exponential cutoff.
We were surprised by the finding of an unadjusted association of less depressive symptoms in patients who had Medicaid or no health insurance in bivariate analysis.
The second assignment focused on bivariate analysis.
In summary, meta-analysis is a method of testing whether findings from multiple studies involving bivariate analysis are homogeneous or heterogeneous, or in other words, do they agree or disagree in terms of the direction of association and effect size?
Bivariate analysis of the associations between each risk factor and oxidative/antioxidative parameters was performed with Pearson's correlation coefficient.