bit

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Bit

The smallest unit of information a computer can hold in its memory. A bit is always represented as a 0 or a 1 in binary code. The word is a contraction of "binary digit."

bit

a digit which takes the value zero or one and which can therefore be represented electronically by an off/on switch in a COMPUTER. Computers use groups of bits to represent numbers or letters for storage, transmission and processing of numerical or alphabetical data. Specifically, computers use various off/on permutations of eight bits to represent all numbers, letters and punctuation characters. Most computers use multiples of eight bits to handle data in this way and various eight-bit, sixteen-bit and thirty-two bit machines are available, the larger ones generally being able to process data faster.
References in classic literature ?
I might be mista'en--but he like gave a sort of a whistle, and I saw a bit of a smile on his face; and he said, "Oh, it's all stuff
We had to go quite a bit farther than usual before we could surround a little bunch of antelope, and as I was helping drive them, I saw a fine red deer a couple of hundred yards behind me.
He didn't want me to study much, but he never said a word about teaching, and I don't believe he will mind a bit.
And wasn't it mesilf, sure, that jist giv'd it the laste little bit of a squaze in the world, all in the way of a commincement, and not to be too rough wid her leddyship?
But there's the bakehus, if you could make up your mind to spend a twopence on the oven now and then,--not every week, in course--I shouldn't like to do that myself,--you might carry your bit o' dinner there, for it's nothing but right to have a bit o' summat hot of a Sunday, and not to make it as you can't know your dinner from Saturday.
So she began nibbling at the righthand bit again, and did not venture to go near the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches high.
We asked him if he had ever tried washing flannels in the river, and he replied: "No, not exactly himself like; but he knew some fellows who had, and it was easy enough;" and Harris and I were weak enough to fancy he knew what he was talking about, and that three respectable young men, without position or influence, and with no experience in washing, could really clean their own shirts and trousers in the river Thames with a bit of soap.
Here was a chance of reading that domestic bit about the child which I had marked on the day of Mr.
It's attacking my nerve-centres, eating them up, bit by bit, cell by cell--from the pain.
It's got some life in it so as it sticks out a bit.
Bartle entered quietly, and, going up to Adam, grasped his hand and said, "I'm just come to look at you, my boy, for the folks are gone out of court for a bit.
We're all right for a bit, then," he said; "but it's a pretty sort of a picnic you're on, eh?