birth rate

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Related to birth: birth certificate, childbirth, natural birth

Birth Rate

The number of babies born per 1,000 women of childbearing age in a population. This may be used to help calculate population growth. It is also called the fertility rate.

birth rate

see POPULATION.

birth rate

the number of people born into a POPULATION per thousand per year. In 2004, for example, the UK birth rate was 11 people per 1,000 of the population. The difference between this rate and the DEATH RATE is used to calculate the rate of growth of the population of a country over time. The birth rate tends to decline as a country attains higher levels of economic development. See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although short birth intervals have long been linked to infant and child mortality, most research has relied on retrospective data, which may be inaccurate if participating par-ems misremember the timing of events or omit mention of deceased infants.
A team of Dutch researchers decided to test whether low risk women at the onset of labour with planned home birth have a higher rate of rare but severe outcomes than those with planned hospital births.
Statistics of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi show that the sex ratio at birth fluctuated between 2001 and 2010 for both citizens and non-citizens.
While out-of-wedlock births have long been associated with teen mothers, the birth rate among girls ages 10 to 17 actually dropped last year to the lowest level on record.
A midwife and widow, she had already given birth to 12 children by the age of 37.
1) Similar associations were found between fathers' place of birth and the odds that an infant was breast-fed.
Scientific and theological developments combined with overwhelming popular sentiment to push church leaders toward revising their long-standing official opposition to birth control.
Babies conceived 18 months to 5 years after a previous birth are healthier than those conceived at shorter or longer intervals, a massive data analysis shows.
In opposition to such violent, medicalized births, obstetricians such as Grantly Dick-Read (Natural Childbirth, 1933) and Fernand Lamaze (Painless Childbirth: the Lamaze Method, 1956) introduced more-natural methods, laying groundwork for the contemporary birth movement.
Luckily for parents whose child was born at the Liverpool Women's Hospital, they can register the birth before they leave hospital the as hospital features a dedicated registrar's office on the first floor, outside the Diana, Princess of Wales Suite.
Comment: The interpretation of this study is complicated by the likelihood that women who choose a home birth differ in certain respects from those who plan a hospital birth.
The number of women choosing to give birth at home in Wales has fallen for the first time.