Bipartisan

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Bipartisan

Describing any measure or policy that draws support from two political parties. For example, in the United States, a unanimously passed defense bill may be said to be bipartisan. The term is used in countries with de facto or de jure two-party systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
A similar partisan divide is evident with respect to opinions of congressional Democrats' efforts at bipartisanship.
Too often in this city, bipartisanship is mischaracterized as a weakness, as simply 'going along to get along.
Obama already appears to have gone further in the pursuit of bipartisanship than his predecessors.
Although Flippen acknowledges Train's bipartisanship and interpersonal skills, he fails to capture the ineffable process by which Train's skills produce outcomes--a lamentable but understandable limitation.
Revving up for their ``100 hours'' of legislative drive-bys, the last thing on Democrats' minds was bipartisanship.
The most conspicuous example of institutionalized anti-Arab racism during the early stages of Israel's destruction was a nonbinding resolution blaming Arabs for the violence, which Congress passed on a vote of 410-8, a rare show of bipartisanship.
BOLTON AND BIPARTISANSHIP (The Wall Street Journal, New York)
So I think the only way we're going to cure it is when the American voter rejects that kind of conduct and rewards at least a certain bipartisanship where bipartisanship is called for.
But pull back the curtain and such displays of bipartisanship are still largely politics, say political scientists Peter Trubowitz, of the University of Texas at Austin, and Nicole Mellow, of Williams College.
At the same time, senior Democrats on the committee were adamant that any hopes for bipartisanship will be elusive unless President Bush and Republican congressional leadership drop their demands for creating private accounts.
Moreover, if Bush's talk of bipartisanship is more than empty rhetoric, his needed overhaul of his Cabinet should not stop there.
Old-fashioned bipartisanship, notably the anti-Communist consensus that dominated American foreign policy from the end of the Second World War to the Vietnam War, had its problems.