Biowarfare

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Related to biological warfare: Chemical and Biological Warfare

Biowarfare

The open use by a nation state of germs and other living beings to kill, injure or incapacitate its enemy. There are numerous examples of biowarfare dating back thousands of years. The Biological Weapons Convention was intended to stop biowarfare, but some analysts believe nation states have further developed their capacity to conduct war in this way. See also: Bioterrorism.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are three compelling reasons why the national security establishment ought to be thinking more about, and investing more in, defenses against biological warfare (BW).
Reed, a professor at the Kingston Biological Warfare Laboratory on Queen's University Campus, was seeking an entomologist to develop a different class of weaponry.
Describe current events that involve the potential or realized use of chemical and biological warfare or terrorism and discuss efforts to eliminate or reduce the use of the weapons.
Government labs went through thousands of samples of biological warfare organisms.
During World War II, some of the mentioned countries began a rather ambitious biological warfare research program (Table 2).
The Act makes it very clear that research, development or testing of biological warfare agents would be punished by life in prison.
Although it became a signatory to the BWC in 1972 and became a State Party in 1991, Iraq has developed, produced, and stockpiled biological warfare agents and weapons.
Hank Ellison's Emergency Action for Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents tells police, paramedics, firefighters, and other emergency responders just what actions to take in a crisis involving hazardous materials.
Qiu Mingxuan, a Chinese quarantine official, claimed that residents of east China's Zhejiang Province are still suffering from the effects of Japan's World War II biological warfare.
From 1949 to 1969, scientists had conducted biological warfare tests by releasing bacteria and chemicals from sprayers, automobiles, and airplanes over American cities and states.
A government spokesman in Baghdad said last April that the country's top biowarfare scientist and father of Saddam's clandestine biological warfare programme had been arrested after he was found in possession of "sensitive documents".
Take the Oklahoma City and World Trade Center bombings, add a few hundred thousand casualties to the death tolls, raise the crisis level throughout the country to unprecedented proportions, and then leave the buildings intact as though nothing had happened, and you begin to get a sense of what may be in store for America should terrorists include biological warfare agents such as anthrax or botulinum toxin in their arsenal of weapons.