Binomial Distribution

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Related to binomial: Binomial coefficient, binomial distribution, Binomial series

Binomial Distribution

The distribution of successes and failures of a certain number of Bernoulli trials. A Bernoulli trial is a test in which there are precisely two random outcomes: success and failure. For example, if one is testing whether flipping a coin will result in heads, the two outcomes are yes (success) or no (failure). A binomial distribution, then, would be the number of heads compared to the number of tails in a given number of flips. It is also called a Bernoulli distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
The result of binomial test shows that from four mentioned indexes in the price mix, cash discounts, long-term payment, credit purchase (credit or cheque), and price comparison are significant in the sales of the company, so that the price mix is effective on sales and the second hypothesis of the research (the price mix has significant effect on the sales of the company) is approved.
If the events are random and not correlated, the distribution of the number of successes is a Binomial distribution.
where the right hand side denotes the classical binomial coefficient.
The parameters a and b of the beta-binomial model can be chosen to provide flexibility to handle many possible situations in health services research that have this "probability" nature of constraining between 0 and 1, and are more diffuse than the over-dispersion capabilities of the negative binomial distribution (Morris and Lock 2009).
n] be the partial sum of the first n terms of the right-circulant determinant sequence with binomial coefficients then
Negative binomial distributions were fitted to all pairs of players within a side so that interactions between players could be simulated prior to a match.
The Vuong test (reported in each of the tables) suggests that our zero-inflated models are a significant improvement over standard Poisson or negative binomial models.
Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990), the binomial system dictates that opposing coalitions present two candidates each for every congressional district.
In the previous Nevins and Whitney model (Figure 1), the production process is assumed to be binomially distributed and the required production yield is set equal to the mean of the binomial.
In a 2007 article, we provided statistical support (based partly on a chi-square test of data assumed to conform to a binomial distribution) for the hypothesis that parental choice (family planning) seems likely to be responsible for more same-sex sibships than unlike-sex sibships in families of two.