Vision

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Vision

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It can furthermore be assumed, that the most important visual cue for spatial orientation is binocular vision, because it enables athletes to extract precise information about the locations of objects in three dimensions (Jackson et al.
The goshawk has binocular vision and when he looked at me as he mounted his aerial charge he knew exactly how close to come without a head-on crash.
It provides NHS and private eye examinations, as well as contact lenses and specialist clinics in binocular vision, paediatrics and low vision.
First, Tyrannosaurus rex might well have had excellent binocular vision and been a predator, but still have had a handicap for the detection of motion as my eats do.
Binocular vision allows animals to see three-dimensional objects more clearly, even when the objects are motionless or camouflaged.
One such scientific mystery is how the binocular vision we use to navigate through our three-dimensional (3-D) environment has no difficulty extracting volumetric information from a two-dimensional (2-D) pattern emitted from the glowing phosphors coated on a piece of glass.
Binocular vision problems occur when both eyes do not work in a co- ordinated way.
He has binocular vision and "likes symmetry" and sway.
The famous procede of Raymond Roussel, with its deformation of first line to last ("Les lettres du blanc sur les bandes du vieux billard" [letters of the alphabet in white chalk on the billiard table] becoming, for instance, "les lettres du blanc sur les bandes du vieux pillard" [letters posted by a white man concerning the hordes of the old plunderer]), finally engenders not binocular vision, as its creator probably intended, but instead an ongoing double vision.
Vision therapy is remarkably successful in rehabilitating all types of binocular vision impairments including amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed eyes), or loss of binocular fusion.
to turn away a would-be armed security guard at Consolidated Edison's Indian Point nuclear power plant; the court noted that federal safety regulations require that persons seeking to work as nuclear plant guards have binocular vision.