Bill of Rights

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Bill of Rights

A generic term referring to a (usually concise) list of rights that citizens of a state possess. For example, a bill of rights may include the freedom to practice religion and the freedom to vote for the candidate of one's choice. There are two types of bill of rights. An entrenched bill of rights may not be amended without a complicated process, such as a popular referendum. An unentrenched bill of rights, on the other hand, may be amended or changed by normal legislative procedure. See also: Constitution.
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does not sit altogether comfortably with the enforcement of bills of rights.
The rights that Bills of Rights seek to protect do not necessarily have a timeless appeal; rather they reflect notions that are fashionable at the time of the enactment.
It is not accidental that Bills of Rights bring about results that could not directly be achieved by legislation.
Many countries which have had Bills of Rights have been subjected to dictatorial and tyrannous rule.