bill

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Related to bills: Treasury bills, bills of exchange

Bill

1. A statement given buy a seller to a buyer itemizing the sale and demanding payment. A bill may be for the sale of a good or a service. The bill usually states the names of the counterparties, the goods and/or services purchased, and adds any applicable sales tax or VAT. It may also include the terms of sale, especially if it is a credit sale. A bill is also called an invoice. See also: Receipt.

2. Informal for Treasury bill.

bill

1. A Treasury bill.
2. See due bill.

bill

  1. 1a financial instrument, such as a BILL OF EXCHANGE and TREASURY BILL, that is issued by a firm or government as a means of borrowing money.
  2. the colloquial term used to describe an INVOICE (a request for payment for products or services received).
  3. a draft of a particular piece of legislation that forms the basis of an Act of Parliament, such as the Fair Trading Act 1973.
References in classic literature ?
You knowed he 'uz arter me; en if you run off, 'stid o' stayin' here to he'p him, he'd know dey 'uz somethin' wrong 'bout dis business, en den he would inquire 'bout you, en dat would take him to yo' uncle, en yo' uncle would read de bill en see dat you be'n sellin' a free nigger down de river, en you know HIM, I reckon
The most considerable of the remaining objections is that the plan of the convention contains no bill of rights.
Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in the Case of a Bill.
To prevent, therefore, giving offence to their customers by any such disappointment, it hath been usual with the honest and well-meaning host to provide a bill of fare which all persons may peruse at their first entrance into the house; and having thence acquainted themselves with the entertainment which they may expect, may either stay and regale with what is provided for them, or may depart to some other ordinary better accommodated to their taste.
To-day there were more changes on the bill of fare than usual.
Fight, or I'll disqualify you--you, Bill, I mean you.
Well," said he, "my mate Bill would be called the captain, as like as not.
She drew her foot as far down the chimney as she could, and waited till she heard a little animal (she couldn't guess of what sort it was) scratching and scrambling about in the chimney close above her: then, saying to herself `This is Bill,' she gave one sharp kick, and waited to see what would happen next.
They therefore brought before a general and extraordinary Assembly of all the States of Flatland a Bill proposing that in every Woman the half containing the eye and mouth should be coloured red, and the other half green.
Inheriting a splendid physique from both parents, at six little Bill was as tall as the average child of eight, well set up and sturdy, afraid of nothing on the place except Martin, who, resenting his attitude, not unreasonably put the blame for it on his wife.
Tough Bill not only paid for the canvas, colours, and brushes, but gave Strickland a pound of smuggled tobacco into the bargain.
As usual, he was in a big motor-car, though not his own, the guest of Swiftwater Bill, Luck's own darling, who had come down to spend the clean-up of the seventh fortune wrung from the frozen Arctic gravel.