bid

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Bid

The price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Sometimes also used in the context of takeovers where one corporation is bidding for (trying to buy) another corporation. In trading, we have the bid-ask spread which is the difference between what buyers are willing to pay and what sellers are asking for in terms of price.

Bid

1. An offer by an investor to buy a security.

2. The highest price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. See also: Ask, Bid-ask spread.

bid

1. The price that a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Compare ask. See also best bid.
2. An offer to purchase something.

Bid.

The bid is the price a market maker or broker is willing to pay for a security, such as a stock or bond, at a particular time. In the real estate market, a bid is the amount a buyer offers to pay for a property.

bid

  1. an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium which the predator must pay for control of the company. However, on occasions, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company, or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an offer to purchase an item (for example, a house or antique vase) which has been put up for sale at a specified price or is to be sold subject to receipt of ‘other prices’. The latter may occur at an AUCTION where a number of would-be buyers each put in a bid for an item, the final sale going to the highest bidder unless a predetermined ‘reserve’ has been set but not reached.

bid

  1. 1an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium that the predator must pay for control of the company On occasions, however, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an indication of willingness to purchase an item that is for sale at the prevailing selling price. This may occur at auction when many purchasers bid for items on sale, the final sale going to the purchaser offering the highest price unless a predetermined reserve price has been set that was not reached. See AUCTION.

bid

(1) An offer to purchase at a specific price, usually at an auction or foreclosure.(2) An offer to complete specified work for a certain price,usually presented in the context of a request for sealed bids to complete government work.
References in periodicals archive ?
A potential selection problem with the above results exists since the analysis uses only observations where at least two bids were placed, and bidders choose whether to place bids, thus endogenously determining whether an observation makes it into the usable sample.
In addition, state agencies must obtain information from bidders about any findings of non-responsibility made within the previous four years by any other governmental entity and if the finding of non-responsibility was due to: (1) engaging in impermissible contacts during a black out period, or (2) intentional provision of false or incomplete information to a governmental agency.
BEI noted the qualified bidders interested in the company will be part of a "fair and open process.
According to the FCC's decision: "Winning bidders from Auction 35 have been forced to treat their obligations as contingent liabilities without deriving any benefit from the underlying asset.
First, and least subject to debate, is that the financial market response to a merger announcement, in terms of abnormal returns to stockholders, reflects expectations about all of the elements (not only efficiency) that may influence the general performance results of a merger as well as differences in expectations between investors and bidders.
To ensure that all bidders are receiving the same information with respect to procedures, a copy of this letter is being sent to counsel for Viacom.
In the competing bid the Konami Bidder offered to purchase substantially all of the assets of the Company in a transaction under Section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code.
Solow, who states that he was a bidder during the 2003 auction, is seeking millions in damages and also potentially a nullification of the sale.
In the end, he found three bidders but disqualified one Wednesday over a conflict of interest problem.
The final step in the auction is for bidders to submit sealed bids for the purchase of the company.
b) Contrariwise, Viacom is the "high" bidder at 4 p.
Complicating matters, researchers after Vickrey further classified models by an assumption about the information that bidders have regarding the value of the auctioned object.