BAN

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BAN

Ban

A subdivision of the Moldovan leu or Romanian leu. One ban is equal in value to 1/100 of one leu. Its plural is bani.

BAN

References in periodicals archive ?
In 1986 prosecutors charged Oak Park, Illinois, gas station owner Donald Bennett with violating the village's handgun ban after he shot at armed robbers.
military's highest court refuses to strike down the armed services' ban on private, consensual sodomy, despite the U.
No one spoke against the ban at the two board meetings where it was discussed.
Canady, then chair of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution (he is a Jeb Bush-appointed district court judge in Florida), now introduced the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1995, and held a hearing on the bill in his subcommittee the very next day.
As former president and chair of the Ontario Hotel and Motel Association, Dozzi says she has a lot of empathy for businesses like hers that are coping with the smoking ban situation.
RADAR) today filed a petition with the federal agency, seeking to keep the proposed ban from going into effect.
The study was based on tiny, volatile numbers, averaging seven heart attacks a month before the ban and four afterward.
Only one person spoke against the ban before the council's vote.
A Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program (MTCP)-funded study, entitled "Smoke Knows No Boundaries: legal strategies for environmental tobacco smoke incursions into the home within multi-family residential dwellings," suggested how governments could be used to ban smoking in the home, specifically within apartment complexes.
The shutdown in Wisconsin shows just how far-reaching the ban on "partial-birth" abortions can be.
Recognizing the eliminating a disease requiresprevention, not treatment, health professionals have been in the forefront of those calling for a national ban on handguns.
The solution to verifying test bans, as well as to curbing the nuclear arms race -- if there is one--is fundamentally political, say many scientists.