Bankroll

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Bankroll

To provide financing, whether as a loan, grant, or simply as part of a budget. For example, a company may bankroll its research and development by providing funding for it in the budget. Likewise, a credit union bankrolls a business when it allows a client to take out a second mortgage on a home.
References in periodicals archive ?
ISN'T IT DISMAL TO SEE THE way so many of our stadiums and arenas are being named after the capitalists who bought the team and bankrolled (or had the public bankroll) the massive temple in which the team plays?
For most of its years, the Jackson Hole Group was bankrolled by InterStudy and other tax-exempt entities - such as the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Kaiser Family Foundation.
has sponsored a table at the annual The Bold & The Bankrolled event held by Colorado Company magazine.
Union organisers are being bankrolled by councils to co-ordinate strike action and distribute literature.
Nearly a third helped families buy a car, four out of 10 paid their debts or bills and a third bankrolled the refurbishment of their homes.
But there is a downside: Villaraigosa's political career will likely rise or fall depending on what he does with the LAUSD -- meaning he may very well owe his political life to those who bankrolled his efforts, all of whom have their own motives for their generosity.
New York Times Balkans correspondent Chris Hedges reported in 1999 that the KLA's founders were "diehard Marxist-Leninists (who were bankrolled in the old days by the Stalinist dictatorship next door in Albania) as well as descendants of the fascist militias raised by the Italians in World War II.
CEO Edward Atsinger, a longtime member of the far-right political steering committee known as the Council on National Policy, is a mogul of far-right politics who has generously bankrolled GOP campaigns in California in the 1990s, including over $528,000 in 1998 alone, His recent forays into antigay politics include $50,000 contributed in 1999 to the campaign supporting the Knight initiative.
The Microsoft Corporation, we learned, had bankrolled a California think tank--ironically named the Independent Institute--to run full-page newspaper ads supporting Microsoft's claim of innocence in the face of federal antitrust charges.