Thai Baht

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Thai Baht

The currency of Thailand. In use since the late 1800s, the baht at different times has been pegged to silver, gold, and various other currencies. After World War II, it was pegged to the U.S. dollar. It began to float during the Asian Financial Crisis in 1997, decreasing in value significantly in a short period of time. It has since stabilized.
References in periodicals archive ?
He later explained that the price he charged was 60,000 baht but that he gave 10,000 baht to his representative in Bua Yai.
All costs in Thai baht currency were converted to US dollars at an exchange rate of 40 bahts per 1 US dollar.
000 millones de bahts del mercado tailandes, ganando a Wall's, parte del conglomerado anglo-holandes Unilever.
Their parents fell into debt and lenders were pressuring them to repay the loan of 4,000 bahts --less than 100 U.
The Bank of Thailand is to include a hologram on its new 1,000 baht denomination, due for issue this November, following the success of the feature in deterring counterfeiting of the 100 and 500 bahts (introduced with holograms in 2004 and 2001 respectively).
Sudara Sereewat, directora de Lucha contra la Explotacion Infantil, ONG con sede en Bangkok, relato el ano pasado los casos de cinco mujeres jovenes, de entre 15 y 23 anos de edad, que fueron traficadas por 10 mil bahts cada una (unos 70 dolares) para trabajar en una casa de masajes en Pattaya.
Now these two-Euro bahts are spreading across the continent like a virus.
According to officials, the company has priced the limited edition Nano Torque electric motorbikes, which are on display at 21 movie theaters in the country, at 24,900 bahts (about $640 each).
Then, a few days before Mr Henry's body was discovered, the caller contacted her again and demanded two million bahts for her partner's return.
When the baht was floated on July 2, 1997, investors lost confidence in the baht and rushed to covert their bahts to dollars.
4 million clients posted turnover of 18 billion bahts (USD450 million) last year.
They worry that a free market for capital threatens to destabilize the world's weaker economies--a hotly controversial issue since the Asian tigers collapsed in 1997, beginning with a rush to dump Thai bahts.