Bagging

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Bagging

The process of placing bulk mail into a large sack for delivery to the post office. Bagging has become less common as mailers increasingly use wooden planks capable of holding 2,000 pounds at a time.
References in classic literature ?
On the eighth night a fearful storm of wind and rain came on while the Herd-boy was on his way to bring the beautiful girl another bag of gold.
There were jam pots and paper bags, and mountains of chopped grass from the mowing machine
So we agreed to this," went on Much, "and spread a cloak down, and he opened his bag and shook it thereon.
He stooped down, picked up the bag of money, and placed it between his teeth.
Now give ten crowns to the postilion," said D'Artagnan, in the tone he would have employed in commanding a maneuver; "two lads to bring up the two first bags, two to bring up the two last, -- and move, Mordioux
At this Kim, already perplexed by the lama's collapse and foreseeing the weight of the bag, fairly lost his temper.
cried Robin to the Miller; whereupon he turned slowly, with the weight of the bag upon his shoulder, and looked at each in turn all bewildered, for though a good stout man his wits did not skip like roasting chestnuts.
It seemed a longer job than I had thought it was going to be; but I got the bag finished at last, and I sat on it and strapped it.
First he drew the larger bag over Numa's head and secured it about his neck with the draw string, then he managed, after considerable effort, during which he barely escaped being torn to ribbons by the mighty talons, to hog-tie Numa--drawing his four legs together and securing them in that position with the strips trimmed from the pigskins.
Then the people thinned away, and, very nearly last of all, a wizened-looking, grey-headed man, carrying a black bag and a parcel, left the platform with hesitating footsteps and turned towards the bridge.
Pengarth very warm from his ride, carrying his hat and a small black bag in his hand.
He drove over to Baywater one Saturday to visit his uncle there and came home the next afternoon, and although it was Sunday he brought a big bag of oatmeal in the wagon with him.