Not-sufficient-funds check

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Not-sufficient-funds check

A bank check having insufficient funds to back it.

Not-Sufficient-Funds Check

A check that a bank refuses to honor because there is not enough money in the payer's checking account to cover the amount of the check. For example, if Bob writes Joe a check for $200, but there is only $175 in Bob's account, then Bob has written a not-sufficient-funds check and the bank will refuse to transfer the funds to Joe's account. It is also called an NSF check, a bad check or a returned check.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The only way to find out if bad check law applies to EFT is to take it to court.
NCG would then send bad check diversion/debt collection letters on district attorney letterhead, often bearing facsimiles of the district attorney's signature, accusing consumers of violating specific state statutes and informing them that a "conviction under this statute is punishable by .
The sources added that the Resolution of Commercial Disputes office will continue to look into cases of bad checks until commercial courts are established.
Gleason reported that Wits had not obtained a psychiatric evaluation as ordered in a previous conviction for bad checks (E&P, April 6, 1991).
But, if a firm's bad check losses are higher, here are a few recommendations that can curtail losses:
Walker said he has heard of three complaints of bad checks from local businesses in the newest incident, but is aware of more in Randolph County.
Gardner believes the change puts restitution in bad check cases in the same class as consumer debt.
A writer of a bad check should be considered a criminal but he is not under current rules," he added.
By virtue of the customer issuing the bad check, do you have a legal basis to have your claim deemed nondischargable, and the debt survive the customer's bankruptcy, thereby allowing you to pursue payment in the future?
A probation officer's report said her victims included a neighbor who loaned her $1,000 for rent after she said she hadn't received her paycheck, a man who let her move in with him after she said her husband was killed, a mover paid with a bad check and a Lancaster hotel where she skipped out on a $300 bill after offering nonexistent concert tickets as payment.