Toxin

(redirected from bacterial toxins)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to bacterial toxins: Exotoxins

Toxin

Any poisonous substance a living thing produces as part of its metabolic or other natural process. That is, toxins themselves are not living things, but are produced by living things. Toxins are defined by the Biological Weapons Convention.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
OMVs liberated from the secretion-active Salmonella 3,10:r:-, have been proposed to be released by pinching off inflated periplasmic organelles filled with bacterial toxins (8) and exoproteins secreted by the general secretory pathway (GSP) (27).
He is currently developing a high-throughput worm genome-wide microarray to screen compounds and develop signature profiles of response to a variety of toxicants, including bacterial toxins, chemicals, metals, and alkylating agents.
Gordon et al [25,26] have speculated that the protective effect of breast milk could in part be attributable to the binding effects of IgA on bacterial toxins, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin C and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin A, implicated in some cases of SIDS.
Scientists now have a method to compare and measure how bacterial toxins affect mammary cells.
Exposure to allergens ranging from bacterial toxins to salivary and fecal antigens from cockroaches has been implicated, and using wood, coal, or gas to heat or cook indoors is also known to trigger attacks.
Lingwood, who's found that verotoxins can destroy cancer cells, adds that he wouldn't be surprised if future research uncovers other means by which these bacterial toxins kill cells.
Kawasaki disease has been blamed on a number of viruses and bacterial toxins in the past.
It has been found that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has the power to neutralize, inactivate and render harmless a wide variety of these bacterial toxins.
Opal's extensive experience investigating bacterial toxins and key mechanisms involved in the establishment of severe bacterial infections will be instrumental to the future success of Aridis Pharmaceuticals.
The researchers used immortalized fat cells to show that bacterial toxins stimulate fat cells to release molecules called cytokines, which promote inflammation.
The choline group acts as docking stations for a number of special proteins that are involved in important processes such as cell-wall division, the release of bacterial toxins, and adhesion to infected tissues.
ulcerans' toxin might be a fatty molecule, a lipid, rather than a protein like other bacterial toxins.