backlog

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Backlog

The total value of orders for a product that have not been filled. The backlog can help a company estimate its future earnings or other performance more accurately. This metric is used most often in manufacturing.

backlog

a build-up of customer orders which a firm has agreed to deliver at specified future dates. Backlogging is one means by which a firm can ‘even out’ demand in relation to its production capacity, allowing delivery lead times to increase during peaks in demand and shorten during slack periods. Backlogs of orders can provide an alternative to STOCKHOLDING or OVERTIME working, and varying the backlog may be the only way of dealing with demand fluctuations in some service industries. See PRODUCTION SCHEDULING.
References in periodicals archive ?
The average backlog for September rose in all regions with the exception of the South, where CBI fell slightly by 0.
In the South, backlog has declined steadily, falling 17.
Compared to April, the average backlog in May rose in each of the four regions that ABC monitors, with the exception of the South.
Backlogs for the Reebok brand at the end of the first quarter of 2006 decreased 14% versus the prior year on a currency-neutral basis.
We are highly optimistic about prospects for fiscal 1996 with strong backlogs carrying attractive margins in both filter bag and pipe operations," Unger added.
DNA backlogs have been a persistent issue in both Philadelphia and Pennsylvania as the demand for DNA testing has risen.
Three of the six agencies--the Departments of Energy (DOE), the Interior (DOI), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)--defined their backlogs as work that was identified to correct deficiencies.
And while the LAPD doesn't collect data that would correlate the backlog with incidents of rape, some believe it could contribute to repeat crimes.
While eventually effective, this common strategy brings with it a litany of problems, including reduced quality, inconsistent service, increased errors, staff burnout and, often enough, new backlogs in the departments where work has been redistributed--a high cost to pay in the name of reduced expenses and staff efficiency.
Cooper says there's no one recommendation that will eliminate backlogs.
I wrote myself a note about backlogs and stuck it to my computer more than a year ago.
Increased Backlog: Respondents remain thankfully "burdened" by order backlogs.