Autocrat

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Autocrat

1. A leader in a government who wields complete and total power. While autocrats do not exist in practice, dictatorships often concentrate power in only a few persons.

2. A person who believes that autocracy is a desirable form of government.
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Highly entrenched autocratic regimes have incentives to adopt such institutions because they expect themselves (or their dynasty broadly understood) to remain in power in the future.
We focus on the effect of long-term exposure to autocratic political institutions.
Tunisians overthrew autocratic leader Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali in January in a revolution that inspired uprisings in Egypt and elsewhere.
A group of "young entrepreneurs" in the US is even working on a prototype internet base station that could fit into a suitcase and be smuggled into foreign countries, giving opponents of autocratic regimes access to the internet.
The AK Party cannot be accused of being autocratic for fighting against such groups for the sake of democracy and rule of law.
An autocratic government is one that maximizes the net income the ruling clique extracts from the remainder of the population; this extraction, in turn, is the difference between the tax revenues the regime collects and the amounts it spends on public services, military activities, and interest.
Again, all this was appropriate for the autocratic monarchies, empires, and feudal fiefdoms that preceded more democratic societies.
WHAT do a 10-year-old bully, a cult leader and an autocratic boss have in common?
It appears that, in effect, the company is now directed by fifty-six-year-old Hughes Gall, the new and autocratic artistic director of the entire Opera House.
She creates her own set of rules, defying the autocratic head (Courtney B.
It was commissioned by Lucca's autocratic ruler as a memorial to his wife and hence an inappropriate model in republican Siena.
It was believed that the various forms of decision styles proposed by Vroom and Yetton were subsumed by the two broad categories of autocratic and participative decision styles.