Autocracy

(redirected from autocracies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Autocracy

A government system in which one person has complete and total power. While autocracy does not exist in practice, dictatorships often concentrate power in only a few persons.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Having set the stage with changes in total consumption for all countries, we now divide countries according to the categories used in B&K: autocracies, hybrid regimes, and democracies.
In anocracies, corruption is most damaging because these societies are high in both pervasiveness and arbitrariness (such as in Russia), while in autocracies, while corruption may be pervasive, it is less arbitrary and therefore more efficient (such as in China).
From his point of view, backing autocracies in the Middle East simply delays the near-certain progression from disillusionment with Islamic fundamentalism to democratic enlightenment.
If the spread of democracy is unlikely to cast autocracies into the dustbin of history along with slavery and imperialism, as McFaul hopes, assisting gradual political liberalization abroad could ameliorate the lot of peoples in developing countries.
Democracies channel funds to pro-democracy groups, or they demand that autocracies change their behavior.
The autocracies are particularly poorly prepared for a global economic crisis because they have weak domestic consumer markets and rely upon exports to survive.
The Chinese and Russians and the leaders of other autocracies cannot welcome this kind of progress.
strategic ends through partnerships with Arab autocracies yields mixed results, at best, in the short term and is cancerous in the longer run.
It aims primarily to provide a defensive barrier against dependence on autocracies from the Old World.
1) In autocracies, officials generally have significant control over economic activity and are unconstrained by democratic institutions, such as political competition (elections), the rule of law, an independent judiciary, and a free press.
As at the end of the 20th century only four (Lithuania, Moldova, Russia and the Ukraine) are categorised by Roeder as democracies; six (Azerbaijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan) are categorised as autocracies, which are governed exclusively by a small group; three (Armenia, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan) are categorised as oligarchies, where the selectorate is a broader group of bureaucrats; and two (Estonia and Latvia) are categorised as exclusive republics, where the selectorate comprises a wide section of society, but not all persons of voting age.
Communal groups in liberalizing autocracies have substantial opportunities for mobilization, but such states usually lack the institutional resources to reach the kinds of accommodation typical of established democracy (Gurr 1993, 165).