Autocracy

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Autocracy

A government system in which one person has complete and total power. While autocracy does not exist in practice, dictatorships often concentrate power in only a few persons.
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Likewise, a "concert of great powers" that many so-called realists want to establish would inevitably founder over the fact that democracies and autocracies disagree not just on material interests but on the core values that should be embedded in the international system.
In the main, people living in democracies are better educated, more prosperous, healthier, and happier than the people who live in autocracies.
11) Among the more salient advances in the field was a set of characteristics for distinguishing among autocracies based on the institutional profile of the ruling elite.
5 years); personalistic autocracies lasted longer (average lifespan: 15.
Because autocratic governments have a vital interest in disputing liberal principles of interventionism, they will often resist efforts by the liberal international community to put pressure on other autocracies around the world.
Neither Russia nor China has any interest in assisting liberal nations in their crusade against autocracies around the world.
21) Conversely, because autocracies tend to be poor, the absence of regulation might simply reflect the absence of effective demand for it by an insignificant number of equity market participants.
For example, a number of countries (Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan) have regressed from oligarchies to autocracies; and a number of democracies have regressed either to autocracies (Azerbaijan) or to oligarchies (Armenia and Georgia).
For the consolidated democracies and autocracies, stability has continued for the first five years of their second decade of rule since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
Russia's move toward greater authoritarianism has helped to shore up embattled autocracies in Belarus and Uzbekistan, and indirectly, in large measure by example, helped to inspire a similar drift towards autocracy in Azerbaijan.
He pointed to the fact that the Arab Spring, contrary to broad expectations, did not result in the replacement of autocracies by democracies, leading instead to an even worse authoritarian regime in Egypt and chaos in Syria and Libya.
Specific topics include embedded liberalism and international regimes, transactions and change; state power and the structure of international trade; the legalization of international monetary affairs; democracies, autocracies, and international trade negotiations; capital mobility and state autonomy; and the politics of national economic policies in a world of global finance.