Attribution

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Attribution

The assignment of cause. For example, if one attributes a statement to a CEO, one says the CEO made the statement. Likewise, if one attributes a market bounce to GDP growth, one says the GDP growth caused the bounce.
References in periodicals archive ?
AppsFlyer believes in empowering marketers with the most innovative, unbiased and transparent attribution and analytics tools.
We believe that user-centric attribution is the key to accurate measurement and analytics which are crucial for businesses today.
Furthermore, by broadening the scope of the analysis to include attributions for the economy and the Iraq War, this study joins Sirin and Villalobos (2011) as the only research, to my knowledge, that directly examines how individuals form responsibility attributions for a foreign affairs issue.
Although little is known about the processes by which participant and team attributions emerge, it seems that personality, experience, and intergroup relationships act as precursors to athlete attributions (Allen et al.
It contains 13 common somatic symptoms, each with a set of three possible attributions or explanations: (1) emotional distress, (2) physical illness, and (3) normal environmental causes.
Weiner (1974), in his development of the achievement motivation model of attributions, classified causal attributions across two dimensions; the locus of causality, and the stability of the cause.
It is what I would like to call "double attribution.
We combine an analysis of contextual events with propositions from both motivational and informational theories in order to predict the presence and intensity of self-serving attributions in the justification of organizational performance.
Based on past research, we predicted that internal and external attributions would be positively associated.
Items addressing educational expectations and achievement attributions were selected from the Student Questionnaire of the TEPS.
Findings regarding these two biases are robust (Wilson and Levine, 1997); however, a comparison of the self-serving and actor-observer biases indicates a contradiction in the attributions expected when performance is positive (Martinko and Gardner, 1987).
Failure is a particularly important outcome to investigate because attributions tend to be more ambiguous than success-generated attributions (Kruger & Dunning, 1999).