attornment


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Attornment

The consent to the transfer of a right. Attornment may be expressed or implied. For example, if a renter continues to live in his/her apartment after the landlord sells the property to a new owner, the renter implies attornment and the new owner becomes the new landlord. The term derives from English feudalism.

attornment

See attorn.
References in periodicals archive ?
The webinar is led by an expert in advising real estate lawyers on subordination, non-disturbance, and attornment agreements, Michael Kuhn, Jackson Walker LLP, and focuses on:
imposing procedural step of attornment in pursuit of an identical goal.
Tenants occupying without estoppel and attornment agreements may be readily removable, but a better idea is sometimes to buy out tenant's "improvements" if an adverse reaction or publicity is deemed likely.
Additionally, and in lieu of a blanket recognition, the Fee Owner may agree to enter into a recognition, non-disturbance and attornment agreement with a Subtenant who meets the same criteria noted above (a "Recognition Agreement").
Similarly, an attornment provision should be added, providing that the tenant will attorn to any new owner of the property after a foreclosure, and that the tenant will provide estoppel certificates and minor lease amendments where necessary to satisfy a lender.
Therefore, in the absence of attornment language, a mortgagee can lose a valuable tenant if it forecloses.