penetration

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Penetration

1. See: Market penetration.

2. In technical analysis, a situation where a security's price falls below its support level or rises above its resistance level. A security penetrating the support (or resistance) is likely to continue to fall (or rise) until another support (or resistance) is found. Penetrating the support is considered highly bearish while penetrating the resistance is highly bullish.

penetration

In charting, breaking through a trendline, resistance level, or support level. The direction of the penetration provides an indication of future price movement.

penetration

see MARKET PENETRATION, MARKET PENETRATION PRICING.
References in classic literature ?
Captain Bonneville was also especially careful to secure the horses, and set a vigilant guard upon them; for there lies the great object and principal danger of a night attack.
I have no doubt of your skill, Dick; I look upon all as dead that may come within range of your rifle, but I repeat that, if they attack the upper part of the balloon, you could not get a sight at them.
It seems that though we have beaten off the attack, Twala is now receiving large reinforcements, and is showing a disposition to invest us, with the view of starving us out.
Thus adjured, after taking hasty counsel with Good and Sir Henry, I delivered my opinion briefly to the effect that, being trapped, our best chance, especially in view of the failure of our water supply, was to initiate an attack upon Twala's forces.
It had this unique feature, that both sides lay open to punitive attack.
And simultaneously with the beginning of that, commenced the momentous struggle of the Germans and Asiatics that is usually known as the Battle of Niagara because of the objective of the Asiatic attack.
Because the thing did not fight back, because it was abject and whining, because it was helpless under him, he abandoned the attack, disengaging himself from the top of the tangle into which he had slid in the lee scuppers.
There was no getting at the wild-dog, no chance to rush against him whole heartedly, with generous full weight in the attack.
But often a pause so gained lengthened out until it evolved into a complete cessation from the attack.
Our heroe received the enemy's attack with the most undaunted intrepidity, and his bosom resounded with the blow.
You forget that, stunned by the attack made on her, Mademoiselle Stangerson was not in a condition to have made such an appeal.
Mademoiselle Stangerson had, no doubt, her own reasons for so doing, since she had told her father nothing of it, and had made it understood to the examining magistrate that the attack had taken place in the night, during the second phase.