apprenticeship


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Apprenticeship

A position in which one learns a trade or occupation by working directly under a skilled person. The student (called an apprentice) may be paid a small amount or may simply receive room and board.

apprenticeship

a form of TRAINING which involves workers committing themselves to one employer for a period of time during which they are to acquire the skills of the trade, mainly through informal instruction by those already skilled (supplemented by some college-provided tuition). Once trained in this way such workers have a set of recognized skills which can, in theory, lead to employment in any organization in the industry. The apprenticeship system has been much censured because it can transmit outdated skills, because competence is defined in terms of time served rather than skills acquired, and because it serves to limit the supply of skilled labour. The employer may not recoup the costs of an apprenticeship in the long run because the apprentice, once trained, may leave for alternative employment. The long-term decline in the apprenticeship system in the UK accelerated towards the end of the 1980s as government removed many of its statutory supports, e.g. by abolishing the Industry Training Boards (established in 1964) and removing the right of those remaining to levy ‘taxes’ on employers to support training. However, mounting alarm about skill shortages led to the apprenticeship system being revitalized in the mid-1990s as the modern apprenticeship. This new form of apprenticeship leads to a NATIONAL VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION, whilst progress during the apprenticeship is monitored more systematically (with reference to clear industry standards) than under the traditional system.
References in periodicals archive ?
He returned to Denbigh High School to explain to pupils in Year 9 how the apprenticeship had helped him turn his life around and gave him the practical skills he needed to set him on the pathway to a successful career.
Mr Boles added: "Businesses and colleges in Birmingham should be congratulated for helping apprenticeships move from strength to strength.
Derek Carter, chief executive of the Portakabin Group said, "These awards are very important to us, having moved from just one apprenticeship in 2011 to 60 trainees this year, showing just how far we have come.
People with an Advanced Level Apprenticeship earn on average over PS100,000 more over the course of their career, than those without.
e National Apprenticeship Service is part of the Skills Funding Agency which is an executive agency to fund skills training for further education in England.
If you don't have an employer-based apprenticeship, check out your local college, which will have suitable courses to get you started.
Area director for the National Apprenticeship Service in the North, Sue Price, said: "To be counting down to the seventh National Apprenticeship Week is really exciting and I look forward to being part of an even more exciting week with more partners supporting the week.
I want all apprenticeships to be high quality, combining paid work
In a new report on the Adult Apprenticeship Programme in England, which is targeted at people aged 19 and over, the Commons Public Accounts Committee (PAC) expressed concerns about the fact that around a fifth of apprenticeships last for only six months or even less.
There are lots of young people really keen to do an apprenticeship and we currently have more than 200,000 potential apprentices registered on 'apprenticeship vacancies', our online matching service (www.
The twists and turns in apprenticeship during this short period reveal much about shifting beliefs, practices, and policies concerning race, gender, and class, which are the author's greatest concerns.