Appointment

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Appointment

A designation in which a person or company allows an agent to act on their behalf. See also: Agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
uk; Why am I waiting: Sandra, left, fears she may have osteoporois but her appointment card, above, says she will have to wait three years for a scan
2%) of the referrals were made by means of a referral note on the chart or an appointment card or examination order sheet given to the patient; 4.
or if you are told that your appointment for outpatient treatment at a certain clinic is for next Monday, even though your VA appointment card shows it is for today, do not argue--and do not leave the VAMC.
After the first appointment, an employer is entitled to ask for certain evidence, with employees being prevented from taking paid leave until both a MATB1 form confirming pregnancy and an appointment card have been shown to the employer.
From September, older people who want to travel free before 9am simply have to show the bus driver an appointment card or letter.
I have been a patient at both the Cardiff Royal Infirmary and the University Hospital of Wales over a 12 year period and on a number of occasions I was given a small hospital appointment card with the particulars of a solicitor giving advice and dealing with injury compensation claims.
It seems I should've done something simple when no appointment card had arrived - phone them.
Under the new system, only patients with an official appointment card proving they have been seen by a Salmaniya Medical Complex (SMC) doctor should be given drugs by the hospital's pharmacy.
Those who have already started a vaccination course should complete it according to the new schedule, and a new appointment card will be sent out.
At the driving school I expected a stern interview - instead, apart from asking me if I suffered from any illness, I was given an appointment card full of rules.
The SNP film uses an actor to tell the fictional story of Bill, a Leith pensioner waiting patiently for his hospital appointment card.
He simply handed me his appointment card and said: "I'm here to see Dr O'Neil.