Appeal

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Appeal

A request to a higher court to review a previously completed criminal or civil case. In general, only one of the parties involved in the original case may appeal it.
References in periodicals archive ?
16 authorizes an award of attorneys' fees at the trial and appellate levels in family law cases.
If the decision is made to seek appellate attorneys' fees as a sanction for filing a frivolous appeal, or raising a frivolous defense thereto, Rule 9.
39) If, within 21 days after this initial service, the party sought to be sanctioned fails to withdraw or correct the challenged claim or defense, the moving party can proceed to file the sanctions motion with the appellate court.
Florida follows the general rule that litigants should bear their own attorneys' fees, unless there is a specific statutory or contractual provision authorizing an award of fees, and the same rule applies to appellate attorneys' fees.
The expertise differential resulting from having ad hoc panels is further ameliorated by the institutional support panels and the Appellate Body both receive.
Thus, contrary to the relationship between courts at different levels of the hierarchy in a domestic system, WTO panels and the Appellate Body have a more complicated relationship.
Panels and the Appellate Body therefore can be seen as having overlapping, but not identical strengths.
The Appellate Body conducts its work in a similar fashion, also explaining its reasoning.
The current Appellate Law Program is a direct result of the initiative taken by a handful of influential members of the Los Angeles legal community six years ago.
Collaborative Planning by the California Court of Appeal, Public Counsel, and the Los Angeles County Bar Association Appellate Courts Committee
In 2005, Second Appellate District Associate Justice Laurie Zelon convened a small group of key stakeholders--from the judiciary, court administration, and the local appellate bar--"to brainstorm how to deliver pro bono legal services to unrepresented appellate litigants.
As the group studied ways to provide assistance to pro se appellate litigants, certain limitations had to be recognized, including the fact that the Second Appellate District was uncomfortable with the court taking on any significant level of supervision and in any event lacked the funding and staffing to do so.