Antitrust Law

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Antitrust Law

Any law opposing trusts, monopolies, and other organizations or practices deemed to be anti-competitive. Antitrust laws especially refer to laws forbidding price-fixing contracts, price discrimination, and tying. Proponents of antitrust laws believe they increase competition, while opponents, notably Ayn Rand, argue that they encourage economic inefficiency and punish success. See also: Sherman Act, Clayton Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The next section describes the development of Japanese antitrust legislation after World War II, and the competing theories and motivations behind successive drafts of regulations.
This should be the starting point of any antitrust legislation - a free market is, therefore, not an unregulated market.
However, such a case would involve antitrust legislation that forbids price fixing and other forms of restraint of trade, rather than issues of price discrimination covered in Robinson-Patman.
The papers focus on how to improve the present European and world-wide systems of antitrust legislation, and in particular, merger clearance regimes.
Furthermore, a series of well-functioning bilateral and regional mutual assistance agreements has been concluded both to facilitate competition enforcement in transnational cases and to avoid the drawbacks of the extraterritorial application of antitrust legislation.
majors over its film market, the Italian government last week endorsed antitrust legislation that would restrict exhibition and distribution by U.
Finally, by setting cavaliers against captains of industry, he exposes the self-interest of sectional politics and advances a progressive agenda: support of child labor reform (the Keating-Owen Act, passed in 1916), support of antitrust legislation (the Clayton Act, passed in 1914), leverage from the threat of blacks voting Democratic (as many, including Du Bois himself, did in 1912), and a refutation of his nemesis Washington and the logic of accommodationism.
Pitney believes it is in full compliance with all antitrust legislation.
The example proposed here requires, among other things, the drafting of country-specific antitrust legislation and the establishment of adequate enforcement mechanisms.
This number may understate the full impact of antitrust legislation, however, because the terms of the proposed mergers were altered in some of the 68 proposed mergers for which federal agencies conducted a preliminary investigation, and the number of parties that would have merged but never filed an intent to do so due to anticipated antitrust problems can never be fully ascertained.
Not that anyone pays any attention to antitrust legislation nowadays anyhow.