pool

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Pool

In capital budgeting, the concept that investment projects are financed out of a pool of bonds, preferred stock, and common stock, and a weighted-average cost of capital must be used to calculate investment returns. In insurance, a group of insurers who share premiums and losses in order to spread risk. In investments, the combination of funds for the benefit of a common project, or a group of investors who use their combined influence to manipulate prices.

Pool

1. A group of financial instruments that may be placed into the same investment vehicle. A major example is a mortgage pool, which consists of mortgages that are divided up and placed into large groups to be sold as securities.

2. Funds that a group of investors put together to invest for mutual benefit. A major example of a pooled fund is a mutual fund.

pool

1. A temporary affiliation of two or more people in an attempt to manipulate a security's price and/or volume. The pool is necessary in order to acquire the capital needed to manipulate a stock having a large market value. Pools were especially popular in the 1920s and early 1930s but now have been regulated out of existence. See also blind pool, trading pool.

pool

A group of mortgage loans used as security for a bond issue. See collateralized mortgage backed securities.

References in periodicals archive ?
In nonfertilized plants, [approximately equal to]70% of the amino acid pool (which accounts for the majority of seasonal variation in rhizome N) was depleted during early-season retranslocation to shoots, and additional current-year N uptake was required to meet roughly half of the N demand for aboveground growth.
The amount of glycine in the free amino acid pool increased significantly during development (ANOVA: [F.
Glycine content in free amino acid pools and protein
is ubiquitously expressed and functions to accumulate lysine and arginine into the intracellular amino acid pools for use in nitrogen metabolism (Verrey et al.
Intracellular free amino acid pools function in cell volume regulation (Pierce, 1982; Yancey et al.
Recovery of symbiotic algae after SDS washing, which is necessary to remove host contamination, is low (McAuley, 1986a), but unlike assays for enzyme activity, measurement of free amino acid pools by HPLC requires only small numbers of algae (the equivalent of [10.