agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
One current topic of investigation is the transcription response of mice with different DNA alkylation repair capabilities upon exposure to alkylating agents.
In a sense, recording individual gene responses to powerful insults such as alkylating agents was akin to studying the effects of poverty by monitoring a person's bank account--the complete picture is much larger than what is actually being measured.
Vion has two agents in clinical trials: Cloretazine(R) (VNP40101M), a unique alkylating agent, is being evaluated in: (i) a Phase III trial in combination with cytarabine in relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia and (ii) a Phase II pivotal trial as a single agent in elderly patients with previously untreated de novo poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.
Osteoporosis is one such potential complication that can result from treatment with alkylating agents and the steroids that are often given with chemotherapy.
The drug is currently not approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis but is indicated for treating B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients who have been treated with alkylating agents and who have failed fludarabine therapy.
The final section of the text is dedicated to molecular principles applied to specific toxicants and includes chapters on alkylating agents and "mustards," oxidative stress in the erythrocyte, aromatic amines and related toxic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens, and acetaminophen.
Alkylating agents are thought to work by producing free radicals in cancer cells and, in theory, antioxidants would interfere with this action.
He and a team of researchers have developed a way to measure the ability of particular cancer cells to repair the damage done to DNA by a category of commonly utilized anti-cancer drugs that are known as alkylating agents, including nitrosourea and cisplatinin.
Using these and other factors, the retrospective study of more than 9,000 patients provides strong statistical evidence that approximately half of the secondary bone cancers observed can be blamed on radiation therapy or on chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as the frequently prescribed cyclophosphamide.
Radiotherapy and chemotherapy with alkylating agents (e.
The classes of chemical compounds that cause cancer--including alkylating agents, DNA-damaging agents, and toxicants that affect the cell cycle--vary in the mechanisms by which they cause the disease.