Alternative Investment Market

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Alternative Investment Market

Any investment other than a stock, bond, or cash. Prominent examples include derivatives, hedge funds, real estate, and commodities. Most of the time, institutional investors and high net-worth individuals are the main holders of alternative investments. This is because they are subject to fewer regulations and are consequently riskier than most other investments. Alternative investments are rarely required to publish independently verifiable financial information. They also have particularly high minimum investments, which discourage casual investors. Alternative investments are controversial in many quarters. Because of the comparative lack of regulation and disclosure, they are subject to scrutiny from politicians and economic analysts. However, they often have high returns.

Alternative Investment Market (AIM)

a market for corporate STOCKS and SHARES that have not obtained a full STOCK MARKET listing. An unlisted securities market (USM) was established in the UK in 1980 in order to provide smaller companies with a means of raising new capital (see SHARE ISSUE) without the expense and the same formalities required by the main stock market. For example, such companies need only have a brief trading record to qualify and the proportion of their shares sold in the open market need only be 10% of their ISSUED CAPITAL instead of the usual 25%. The USM was phased out in 1996 and superseded by the Alternative Investment Market (AIM). AIM imposes no minimum on the percentage of a company's shares in public hands and no minimum trading record.

Alternative Investment Market

see UNLISTED-SECURITIES MARKET.
References in classic literature ?
There was not much excitement produced by the preparations of the youth, who proceeded in a hurried manner to take his aim, and was in the act of pulling the trigger, when he was stopped by Natty.
If you will fire, you should shoot quick, before there is time to shake off the aim.
But if he had put his rifle to his shoulder with evil intent God would have punished him for it; and even if the Lord didn’t, and he had missed his aim, I know one that would have given him as good as he sent, and better too, if good shooting could come into the ‘count.
The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
I imagine that Freemasonry is the fraternity and equality of men who have virtuous aims," said Pierre, feeling ashamed of the inadequacy of his words for the solemnity of the moment, as he spoke.
I wish you to observe," says Cardinal Newman, "that the mere dealer in words cares little or nothing for the subject which he is embellishing, but can paint and gild anything whatever to order; whereas the artist, whom I am acknowledging, has his great or rich visions before him, and his only aim is to bring out what he thinks or what he feels in a way adequate to the thing spoken of, and appropriate to the speaker.
Any one who cares to do so might test the validity of those rules in the nearest possible way, by applying them to the varied examples in this wide [6] survey of what has been actually well done in English prose, here exhibited on the side of their strictly prosaic merit--their conformity, before all other aims, to laws of a structure primarily reasonable.
Then withdrawing into the road, and taking aim, he resumes:-
That's it, sir,' returns Durdles, quite satisfied; 'at which he takes aim.
It aims to express the inner truth or central principles of things, without anxiety for minor details, and it is by nature largely intellectual in quality, though not by any means to the exclusion of emotion.
An admirable statement of the aims of the Library of Philosophy was provided by the first editor, the late Professor J.
As Professor Muirhead continues to lend the distinction of his name to the Library of Philosophy it seemed not inappropriate to allow him to recall us to these aims in his own words.